Chippewa River Waterwalk

April 20-25

Walk begins on April 20 at New Post, Wisconsin at the convergence of the East and West Chippewa Rivers and ends at Wabasha, Minnesota. This walk is in collaboration with the University of Wisconsin at Eau Claire to commemorate Aldo Leopold’s work.

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Upcoming Water Walks

View current GPS location of walkers here. (not working for Kinnickinnic River Walk)

Kinnickinnic River Nibi Walk

Saturday, May 21, 2022

Twenty two miles, from north of River Falls, Wisconsin, to Kinnickinnic State Park, between Hudson and Prescott, WI, at the confluence of the Kinnickinnic and St. Croix Rivers.

We gather this Saturday morning at 8:30 at these coordinates near Roberts

140th and 60th near the fishery headwaters.

There is a carpooling network going on and if anyone wants to carpool from River Falls people are meeting at Glen Park at 8 o’clock

How to follow the route of the walkers.

This is so you don’t get lost. For this walk there is no GPS tracker on the walkers, please trust that with this map and patience you can find us.

  • Download the Gaia GPS app from your app store or Itunes. It is free but you will need to create an account in order to sign in.
  • Click on this link for the Kinnickinnic River Nibi Walk route.
  • Once you have logged into the Gaia App you will be able to see the Kinnickinnic River Nibi Walk route
  • If you are not able to see the Waypoint icons (headwaters, trail markers, confluence, etc):
    • Look for the “map overlay” at the top right of your screen. It looks like a stack of papers.
    • Click the right > and make sure that Routes, Waypoints, and Waypoint toggles are all selected as on/green.
    • Exit out of map overlays with the back arrow.
  • For driving directions to the Kinni Headwaters (the start of the Nibi walk):
    • Click anywhere on the red Kinni River Nibi Walk route
    • Select “More”
    • Select “Driving Directions”. This will link to a google map showing you directions to the start from your current location.
  • If you want to be able to follow the app when you do not have phone service, download the map at home while you still have internet access:
    • Click on the red Kinni River Nibi Walk route
    • Select “More”
    • Select “Download Map Along Route”. With the maps downloaded, your phone can be in airplane mode and your GPS will still track your movement along the route.

The walk will end at the Kinnickinnic state park. Where the Kinnickinnic River flows into the Saint Croix is at the bottom of an extremely steep hill. We will be having our ceremony at the bottom. Not everybody will be able to make it back up this hill. So please judge it for yourself. We will come back up and have our feast.

Everyone that goes into the park with a car will be charged a state park fee. Residence is eight dollars and non-residence is $11.

Cedar and Iowa Rivers Nibi Walk

Postponed to August 2022

The focus on this walk is to give invited young people an opportunity to learn in depth about the Nibi Walk Ceremony. Adult participation, in support of the youth, will be by invitation.

The Cedar River is a major tributary of the Iowa River. The walk will begin in Dodge County, Minnesota and ending in the Mississippi River near Cedar Rapids. More details to come.

The walk will begin near Sargeant, MN at the intersection of 330 and 620th st. and end on County road X71 at the confluence of the Iowa and Mississippi rivers. To find the walkers during the walk, use the GPS map.

Haw River and Cape Fear River

Dates to be Determined

The Haw River is a major tributary of the Cape Fear River, running through central North Carolina. Together this walk travels roughly 300 river miles.

Mississippi River Walk – 2023

This walk will bring the water from the dead zone in the gulf to the headwaters for healing. This walk will be made by our leader Sharon Day and a group of young women who aspire to be ogitchidagkwe, future leaders of water walks. You are welcome to walk in solidarity and support with them all or part of the way. Begins in Fort Jackson, Louisiana and ends in Itasca, Minnesota.

Press Release: May 2014

MEDIA ALERT/PHOTO OPPORTUNITY
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
MORE INFO:
SHARON DAY,  smarieday@aol.com, 651-325-8077
CAMILLE GAGE,  nibiwalk@gmail.com, 651-398-6028

 

SINGING TO THE SPIRIT OF THE RIVER

Indigenous-led 981 Mile Ohio River Nibi (Water) Walk began Earth Day

The rivers are the arteries of the earth and they are in peril, with the Ohio River bearing the dubious distinction of being the most polluted waterway in North America.*  Once beautiful and free flowing, the Ohio is now misshapen by 20 dams and made toxic from coal mining, agricultural runoff, chemical spills, and fracking waste. The recent coal slurry spills and the chemical spills at Elk River, which feeds into the Ohio, are merely the latest chapter in the ongoing plight of the River and the people who live near her shores.

Despite growing environmental awareness the challenges facing the Ohio and all of our fresh water continue to mount. Ongoing activism is crucial however we must also embark on a spiritual journey – one that will lead us to honor the water and embrace that all things are connected: that together with our lakes, streams and rivers, we will thrive or perish. 

Water is life: the Nibi Walkers invite all to journey with them. 

Nibi means water in the Anishinaabe language. In Anishinaabe teachings it was promised that the water would always flow down to us as long as we remembered to sing and make offerings to the water.

The Nibi Walkers believe these songs and offerings are crucial now, when the health of our freshwater is at great risk. They invite people from all walks of life to join them – in person or in spirit – on this sacred mission.

On Earth Day – April 22 – the Nibi Walkers began a 35 day, 981-mile, walk down the Ohio River. They are carrying a ceremonial copper vessel of water from the confluence of the Ohio River at Point State Park in Pittsburgh, PA to Cairo, IL, where the Ohio joins the Mississippi River. They will walk, pray, and sing daily, sun-up to sun-down, to heal and honor the River. Though steeped in Anishinaabe ritual and beliefs, people of all faiths are welcome to walk for an hour, a day, or more.

“We want the Walk to be a prayer,” says Sharon Day, the leader of the Ohio River walk. “Every step we take we will be praying for and thinking of the water.  The water has given us life and now we will support the water.”

To learn more about the Ohio River Nibi Walk visit  www.nibiwalk.com.

Sharon Day, the Anishinaabe elder leading the Ohio River Nibi Walk, is available for interviews.  Please contact her directly at the number listed above. Photo of Sharon Day with Eagle Staff by Camille J. Gage; high resolution file available on request.

*A 2012 report of  Environment America Research and Policy Center states that the Ohio is North America’s most polluted river, with approximately 32,111,718 pounds of toxic discharge entering the waterway annually*

 

Press Release
MEDIA ALERT/PHOTO OPPORTUNITY
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
MORE INFO: SHARON DAY, smarieday@aol.com, 651-325-8077
CAMILLE GAGE, nibiwalk@gmail.com, 651-398-6028

SINGING TO THE SPIRIT OF THE RIVER
Indigenous-led 981 Mile Ohio River Nibi (Water) Walk begins April 22, 2014

MEDIA AVAILABILITY
Tuesday, April 22, Earth Day, 9 to 10AM
Water Steps at North Shore Riverfront Park, Pittsburgh, PA

The rivers are the arteries of the earth and they are in peril, with the Ohio River bearing the dubious distinction of being the most polluted waterway in North America.* Once beautiful and free flowing, the Ohio is now misshapen by 20 dams and made toxic from coal mining, agricultural runoff, chemical spills, and fracking waste. The recent coal slurry spills and the chemical spills at Elk River, which feeds into the Ohio, are merely the latest chapter in the ongoing plight of the River and the people who live near her shores.

Despite growing environmental awareness the challenges facing the Ohio and all of our fresh water continue to mount. Ongoing activism is crucial however we must also embark on a spiritual journey – one that will lead us to honor the water and embrace that all things are connected: that together with our lakes, streams and rivers, we will thrive or perish.

Water is life: the Nibi Walkers invite all to journey with them.

Nibi means water in the Anishinaabe language. In Anishinaabe teachings it was promised that the water would always flow down to us as long as we remembered to sing and make offerings to the water.
(Continued next page)
The Nibi Walkers believe these songs and offerings are crucial now, when the health of our freshwater is at great risk. They invite people from all walks of life to join them – in person or in spirit – on this sacred mission.

Beginning on Earth Day – April 22 – the Nibi Walkers will begin a 35 day, 981-mile, walk down the Ohio River. They will carry a ceremonial copper vessel of water from the confluence of the Ohio River at Point State Park in Pittsburgh, PA to Cairo, IL, where the Ohio joins the Mississippi River. They will walk, pray, and sing daily, sun-up to sun-down, to heal and honor the River. Though steeped in Anishinaabe ritual and beliefs, people of all faiths are welcome to walk for an hour, a day, or more.
“We want the Walk to be a prayer,” says Sharon Day, the leader of the Ohio River walk. “Every step we take we will be praying for and thinking of the water. The water has given us life and now we will support the water.”
To learn more about the Ohio River Nibi Walk visit http://www.nibiwalk.com.

Sharon Day, the Anishinaabe elder leading the Ohio River Nibi Walk, is available for interviews. Please contact her directly at the number listed above. Photos available on request.

* A 2012 report of Environment America Research and Policy Center states that the Ohio is North America’s most polluted river, with approximately 32,111,718 pounds of toxic discharge entering the waterway annually*

Press Release: April 2014

MEDIA ALERT/PHOTO OPPORTUNITY
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
MORE INFO: SHARON DAY, smarieday@aol.com, 651-325-8077
CAMILLE GAGE, nibiwalk@gmail.com, 651-398-6028

SINGING TO THE SPIRIT OF THE RIVER
Indigenous-led 981 Mile Ohio River Nibi (Water) Walk begins April 22, 2014

MEDIA AVAILABILITY
Tuesday, April 22, Earth Day, 9 to 10AM
Water Steps at North Shore Riverfront Park, Pittsburgh, PA

The rivers are the arteries of the earth and they are in peril, with the Ohio River bearing the dubious distinction of being the most polluted waterway in North America.*  Once beautiful and free flowing, the Ohio is now misshapen by 20 dams and made toxic from coal mining, agricultural runoff, chemical spills, and fracking waste. The recent coal slurry spills and the chemical spills at Elk River, which feeds into the Ohio, are merely the latest chapter in the ongoing plight of the River and the people who live near her shores.

Despite growing environmental awareness the challenges facing the Ohio and all of our fresh water continue to mount. Ongoing activism is crucial however we must also embark on a spiritual journey – one that will lead us to honor the water and embrace that all things are connected: that together with our lakes, streams and rivers, we will thrive or perish.

Water is life: the Nibi Walkers invite all to journey with them.

Nibi means water in the Anishinaabe language. In Anishinaabe teachings it was promised that the water would always flow down to us as long as we remembered to sing and make offerings to the water.
(Continued next page)
The Nibi Walkers believe these songs and offerings are crucial now, when the health of our freshwater is at great risk. They invite people from all walks of life to join them – in person or in spirit – on this sacred mission.

Beginning on Earth Day – April 22 – the Nibi Walkers will begin a 35 day, 981-mile, walk down the Ohio River. They will carry a ceremonial copper vessel of water from the confluence of the Ohio River at Point State Park in Pittsburgh, PA to Cairo, IL, where the Ohio joins the Mississippi River. They will walk, pray, and sing daily, sun-up to sun-down, to heal and honor the River. Though steeped in Anishinaabe ritual and beliefs, people of all faiths are welcome to walk for an hour, a day, or more.
“We want the Walk to be a prayer,” says Sharon Day, the leader of the Ohio River walk. “Every step we take we will be praying for and thinking of the water.  The water has given us life and now we will support the water.”
To learn more about the Ohio River Nibi Walk visit HYPERLINK “http://www.nibiwalk.com” www.nibiwalk.com.

Sharon Day, the Anishinaabe elder leading the Ohio River Nibi Walk, is available for interviews. Please contact her directly at the number listed above. Photos available on request.

* A 2012 report of Environment America Research and Policy Center states that the Ohio is North America’s most polluted river, with approximately 32,111,718 pounds of toxic discharge entering the waterway annually*

Link for the GPS track of the Ohio River Water Walk

Please use the link below to have a more exact idea of where the water walkers are on any given day. If you are planning on walking, please see Sharon Day’s guide for volunteer walkers in our facebook group: Mississippi River Water Walk 2013

The link below will take you to our shared GPS page, which tracks the exact location of our walkers:

http://share.findmespot.com/shared/faces/viewspots.jsp?glId=0oaqcs5BLymRDvfAGiECgJRMjiA8qqps8